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When you’re deciding to get a company identity, you tend to think about letterheads, business cards and signs over shopfronts, increasingly people recognise the need to have a web-friendly logo too, but very ever pause to think about their brand identity when it comes to staff clothing.  Working with a designer, like the multinationals do, can give you the edge when it comes to immediately identifiable company clothing, but if you’re going to go it alone, here are some things to consider:

Does your logo have relevance to your customers’ requirements, not just your own business?  It’s not much use choosing a Rolls-Royce as your logo if you’re in the delivery business, even if you did start your company delivering from a Rolls-Royce, your potential customers don’t know that and they don’t care!  They want a logo that tells them you’re a delivery company.Does it appeal to you and your staff? Expecting people to wear something that makes them feel degraded or ill-equipped to represent you in the workplace is a bad investment – you’ll lose good staff and you’ll lose your public image. Regardless of how much you love your wife/daughter/brother and how good a degree they got from arts college, if they design a logo that is cute, when your team think of themselves as cool professionals, everybody loses. Does the logo demonstrate:

  • A sense of balance – is the relationship between image and any typeface balanced and harmonious?
  • A sense of colour – the logo has to work winter and summer, for men and women, and on a range of clothing from T-shirts to winter coats
  • Creativity – can it be read, but is it more than just your company name turned into an emblem? Does it say something about your company, your aims and perspective and your distinctiveness?  That Rolls Royce, with a large letter bearing your company name strapped to its roof, would be creative and fun
  • Sensible typography – this is vital – what’s the point of a logo that nobody can read?  Drive along any town centre and you’ll see one or two shops whose names are written in such fancy script you can’t actually be sure what they are called – don’t let that be you!

Logo courtesy of squeakymarmot

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